Sunday, May 2, 2010

'C.S. Lewis on Scripture' by Michael J. Christensen

C.S. Lewis on Scripture: His Thoughts on the Nature of Biblical Inspiration, the Role of Revelation, and the Question of Errancy C.S. Lewis on Scripture: His Thoughts on the Nature of Biblical Inspiration, the Role of Revelation, and the Question of Errancy by Michael J. Christensen


My rating: 5 of 5 stars
For some of my friends, "C.S. Lewis on Scripture" might be like "Irrelevance on Irrelevance." I think there are some good reasons to second-guess that initial reaction. Michael J. Christensen looks at how Lewis' deep and wide knowledge of literature, poetics, mythology, and philosophy informed his view of Scripture. So in addition to Lewis' Christianity, Christensen spends equal time on his approach to literary criticism, philosophy, and his profound appreciation for myth. More specifically, Christensen addresses Lewis' neo-Platonic tendencies, romanticism and literary fellow travelers, as well as a brief survey of historical views of the inspiration of the Bible. In the appendix entitled "Lewis: The Rational Romantic," Christensen writes, "Reason and imagination for Lewis are the complementary human faculties of knowing." A large part of the book could be seen as unpacking that statement. But that's not to overlook Christensen's situating of Lewis in the context of evangelical controversies about the Bible and how it is understood dogmatically.

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